85 results found

Medical waste management

GAIA's note on medical waste management. In order to fulfill the medical ethic to "first do no harm," health care providers have a responsibility to manage waste in ways that protect the public and the environment. The first step is waste minimization and separation, and the next is treating infectious waste to prevent the spread of disease.

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The cement kiln portal

Groundwork's cement kiln portal top page. It outlines the general description of waste burning in cement kilns, and the manufacturing process of cement. All around the world communities are fighting cement kilns. With the current drive to reduce CO2 emissions, save on the cost of fuel and get rid of all kinds of waste, many cement companies are burning, or considering burning, what are politely called "alternative fuels" but should really be called waste.

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Energy and fuel in cement kilns

Groundwork's well-summarized report on energy and fuel in cement kilns. Shows how different fuels affet the emission levels of toxics from cement kilns, how mercury or dioxin is emitted. Because the process of turning limestone into clinker requires high temperatures, the cement industry is one of the most energy intensive industries, consuming about 10 times more energy than the average required by industry in general.

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Waste picker rights

GAIA's note on waste picker rights. In many parts of the developing world, collecting and sorting waste "informally" provides a livelihood for large numbers of the urban poor, who often work in deplorable conditions. GAIA believes that advocating for waste picker rights is an important part of working for environmental justice.

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