26 Result(s) found

Incineration / waste-to-energy

We can take steps, large and small, to stop the climate crisis. What we cannot afford to do is go down the wrong road. Hoodwinked in the Hothouse is an easy and essential guide to navigating the landscape of false solutions—the cul-desacs on the route to a just and livable climate future. Includes Waste-to-Energy, Landfill-gas-retrieval, and biomass.


Document Type: Report&Data

Large studies have shown higher rates of adult and childhood cancer and also birth defects around municipal waste incinerators. Incinerator emissions are a major source of fine particulates, of toxic metals and of more than 200 organic chemicals, including known carcinogens, mutagens, and hormone disrupters. Present safety measures are designed to avoid acute toxic effects in the immediate neighbourhood, but ignore the fact that many of the pollutants bioaccumulate, can enter the food chain and can cause chronic illnesses over time and over a much wider geographical area.


Year of publication : 2008
Document Type: Report&Data

Statement of evidence which illustrates the relationship between particulates / ultrafine particles and human health. The importance of the precautionary principle is also raised.


Region: Europe
Year of publication : 2009
Document Type: Report&Data

Energy Justice Network's presentation on landfill gas, biomass and incineration.


Region: North America
Year of publication : 2007
Document Type: Presentation

This report by GAIA and Essential Action details the problems of waste incineration: pollutant releases both to air and other media, economic costs and employment costs, energy loss, unsustainability, and incompatibility with other waste management systems, and the health and environmental effects of pollutants emitted by incinerators.


Year of publication : 2003
Document Type: Report&Data

Introduction to health effects of incineration. Occupational health impacts. Health impacts on populations living near to incinerators. Environmental contamination. Incinerator releases. The solution: reduce, re-use and recycle and phase out incineration.


Year of publication : 2001
Document Type: Report&Data

Incinerator and landfill industries are trying to shed their dirty reputations and profit from the climate crisis by “greenwashing” waste disposal as a source of clean and renewable energy around the globe. Using names like “waste to energy”, gasification, and plasma, waste companies have gained access to subsidies in some national and global renewable energy programs. Subsidies encourage the construction and expansion of expensive, pollution-ridden and climate-changing incinerator and landfill projects—and it obstruct community-based efforts to stop waste and global warming.


Document Type: Factsheet

Extracts from “Resources up in Flames: The Economic Pitfalls of Incineration versus a Zero Waste Approach in the Global South".
Incinerator proponents buy into a number of myths when trying to sell projects. Here are some common myths surrounding municipal solid waste incineration:
Myth: Incinerators provide a solution to the problem of rapidly increasing waste.
Myth: Incinerators maximize the use of scarce landfill space.


Document Type: Factsheet

1. A zero waste approach is one of the fastest, cheapest, and most effective strategies we can use to protect the climate and the environment. Significantly decreasing waste disposed in landfills and incinerators will reduce greenhouse gases the equivalent to closing one-fifth of U.S. coal-fired power plants. This is comparable to leading climate protection proposals such as improving vehicle fuel efficiency. Indeed, implementing waste reduction and materials recovery strategies nationally are essential to put us on the path to stabilizing the climate by 2050.


Year of publication : 2008
Document Type: Report&Data

Extracts from “Resources up in Flames: The Economic Pitfalls of Incineration versus a Zero Waste Approach in the Global South” by Brenda A. Platt, Institute for Local Self-Reliance.
1. Incineration is the most costly solid waste management option
2. Incineration increases the indebtedness of host countries
3. Incineration is capital-intensive v. labor-intensive
4. Waste composition affects incinerator operation and finances
5. Incineration will adversely impact the informal sector and the informal sector will adversely impact incineration


Document Type: Factsheet

Waste policy has important climate change impacts, from, at one end, the emission savings by waste prevention or from recycling, to at the other end, the problem of methane emissions from landfill. Waste prevention is the most beneficial option from a climate point of view, followed by reuse and recycling; landfill and incineration are worse options. The UK Government is currently reviewing England’s waste policy, and is proposing to process 25% through energy from waste. But what is energy from waste?


Year of publication : 2006
Document Type: Report&Data

This report lays down some challenges to conventional wisdom and some dearly held beliefs. It is a piece of work which, from the author’s perspective, has been many years in its gestation, and which has a number of important implications.


Year of publication : 2006
Document Type: Report&Data

Summary of pollutants/toxics from incinerators and their health / environmental effects.


Document Type: Factsheet

This document is available as supplementary data for inclusion as online documentation. It includes:
a) Table 1, showing the list of tumors analyzed
b) Table 2, showing a description of industrial facilities analyzed in the paper
c) Table 3, showing the types of substances and amounts released to air by Spanish–based incinerators and hazardous waste treatment installations
d) Table 4, showing the types of substances and amounts released to water by Spanish–based incinerators and hazardous waste treatment installations


Region: Europe
Year of publication : 2013
Document Type: Report&Data

GAIA's factsheet on incineration.
FACT1: Municipal waste is non-renewable, consisting of discarded materials such as paper, plastic and glass that are derived from finite natural resources such as forests that are being depleted at unsustainable rates.
FACT2: All incinerators pose considerable risk to the health and environment of neighboring communities as well as that of the general population.
FACT3: Burning waste contributes to climate change. Incinerators emit more carbon dioxide (CO2) per unit of electricity (2988 lbs/MWh) than coal-fired power plants.


Region: Europe
Year of publication : 2012
Document Type: Factsheet

A report for UKWIN in respect of an incinerator proposed for the Battlefield site at Shrewsbury in Shropshire. It considers the climate change impacts of landfilling or incinerating residual waste in the Shropshire region. Comparisons are made between 90,000 tonnes of waste sent to incinerator and landfill over a 20 year period. Since landfill emissions continue to occur for some time after this period, total impacts are also considered over a 150 year period.


Region: Europe
Year of publication : 2011
Document Type: Report&Data

Background: Waste treatment plants release toxic emissions into the environment which affect neighboring towns.
Objectives: To investigate whether there might be excess cancer mortality in towns situated in the vicinity of Spanish-based incinerators and installations for the recovery or disposal of hazardous waste, according to the different categories of industrial activity.


Region: Europe
Year of publication : 2013
Document Type: Scientific journal article

UKWIN (United Kingdom Without Incineration Network)'s introductory note on greenhouse gas emissions from an incinerator. Original URL: http://ukwin.org.uk/resources/faq/how-much-co2-does-an-incinerator-emit/


Document Type: Factsheet

UKWIN (United Kingdom Without Incineration Network)'s introductory note on climate impacts of incinerators. Original URL: http://ukwin.org.uk/resources/climate-change/


Document Type: Factsheet

UKWIN (United Kingdom Without Incineration Network)'s introductory note on dioxins and other harmful incinerator emissions. Original URL: http://ukwin.org.uk/resources/health/dioxins-and-other-harmful-incinerat...


Document Type: Factsheet

UKWIN (United Kingdom Without Incineration Network)'s introductory note on health issues connected with incinerators. Original URL: http://ukwin.org.uk/resources/health/


Document Type: Factsheet

UKWIN (United Kingdom Without Incineration Network)'s introductory note on incineration. Six reasons to oppose incineration are:
-Depresses recycling and wastes resources
-Releases greenhouse gasses
-Is often forced through against strong public opposition
-Relies on exaggerating future quantities of waste instead of strongly increased recycling and composting
-Creates toxic emissions and hazardous ash
-Poses significant health risks


Document Type: Factsheet

Greenpeace's introductory note on pollution and health impacts of waste incinerators. Original URL: http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/MultimediaFiles/Live/FullReport/3809.PDF


Document Type: Factsheet

Groundwork's factsheet on incineration. Summarizes the problems etc. Original URL: http://www.groundwork.org.za/Resources/FactSheets/incinerationff.html


Document Type: Factsheet

GAIA's note on incinerators. Burning waste has many negative environmental,social and health consequences. From polluting our air,land and water to harming our economies,warming the climate,violating the principles of environmental justice, and fueling an unsustainable system of consumption and wasting,incinerators are simply the worst of all waste management options.

Original URL: http://no-burn.org/section.php?id=84


Document Type: Factsheet

GAIA's note on waste and climate. Burning and landfilling waste drives climate change by releasing greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide from incinerators and methane from landfills. Waste disposal also drives climate change by depriving the economy of reused, recycled and composted materials, fueling a linear consumption system that requires the use of more energy and raw materials to create new goods.

Original URL: http://no-burn.org/section.php?id=85


Document Type: Factsheet