9 Result(s) found

Landfill

We can take steps, large and small, to stop the climate crisis. What we cannot afford to do is go down the wrong road. Hoodwinked in the Hothouse is an easy and essential guide to navigating the landscape of false solutions—the cul-desacs on the route to a just and livable climate future. Includes Waste-to-Energy, Landfill-gas-retrieval, and biomass.


Document Type: Report&Data

While major waste companies promote landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects that purport to capture methane released from landfills and convert it to electricity, a better solution lies in organics recycling.


Region: North America
Document Type: Report&Data

The Landfill Gas to Energy (LFGTE) Task Force was asked to evaluate whether LFGTE facilities decrease or increase net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We have unanimously concluded that reliance on landfill gas to generate electricity results in increased net GHG emissions. This is clearly the case when considering the fate of new wastes that could be diverted to waste management facilities more appropriate than landfills, and is almost certainly true for wastes already buried in landfills that collect landfill gas and flare it.


Region: North America
Year of publication : 2010
Document Type: Report&Data

Energy Justice Network's presentation on landfill gas, biomass and incineration.


Region: North America
Year of publication : 2007
Document Type: Presentation

"Landfill gas" is not the same as "natural gas" or "methane." They are three separate terms that mean different things. The term "landfill methane" is deceiving as it implies that landfill gas is simply methane. Landfill gas is about 45-55% methane, with the remainder being mostly carbon dioxide (CO2). It also contains hundreds of toxic contaminants known as Non-Methane Organic Compounds (NMOCs) as well as inorganic toxic contaminants like mercury and sometimes even radioactive contaminants like tritium.


Region: North America
Year of publication : 2008
Document Type: Factsheet

1. A zero waste approach is one of the fastest, cheapest, and most effective strategies we can use to protect the climate and the environment. Significantly decreasing waste disposed in landfills and incinerators will reduce greenhouse gases the equivalent to closing one-fifth of U.S. coal-fired power plants. This is comparable to leading climate protection proposals such as improving vehicle fuel efficiency. Indeed, implementing waste reduction and materials recovery strategies nationally are essential to put us on the path to stabilizing the climate by 2050.


Year of publication : 2008
Document Type: Report&Data

A report for UKWIN in respect of an incinerator proposed for the Battlefield site at Shrewsbury in Shropshire. It considers the climate change impacts of landfilling or incinerating residual waste in the Shropshire region. Comparisons are made between 90,000 tonnes of waste sent to incinerator and landfill over a 20 year period. Since landfill emissions continue to occur for some time after this period, total impacts are also considered over a 150 year period.


Region: Europe
Year of publication : 2011
Document Type: Report&Data

GAIA's note on waste and climate. Burning and landfilling waste drives climate change by releasing greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide from incinerators and methane from landfills. Waste disposal also drives climate change by depriving the economy of reused, recycled and composted materials, fueling a linear consumption system that requires the use of more energy and raw materials to create new goods.

Original URL: http://no-burn.org/section.php?id=85


Document Type: Factsheet

GAIA's note on landfills. Landfills pollute our air, land, and water, and their use fuels an unsustainable linear system of consumption and wasting. As the largest human-created source of methane gas in the world, landfills are also a significant contributor to global climate change.

Original URL: http://no-burn.org/article.php?list=type&type=86


Document Type: Factsheet